Home Towards a subjective collective cartography
QU'EST-CE QUE C'EST?
WHAT IS THIS?
WAT IS HET?
SEARCH
CONTACT
40 more maps that
Ton Bruxelles, (...)
Mapping for Niger
Villa Morel
les 9 yeux de google
Un très beau rayon
Dans et hors la (...)
L’incroyable téléphér
Dans les plis de la
Maps of Babel
Actions
Anouncements
Architecture
Art
Atlas
Ballades urbaines
carto
catalogue
collaborative
collective
commune
Conflicts
Data model
Diagram
Economy
Exploration
Free data
G.P.S
Game
gentrification
geodemographic profiling
Graphics
Humour
idées-théories
Imagination
inspiration
journal des outils
map
Mindmap
Multi-layered
politic
Print
projets
Psychogeography
Route
Satellite
sensible
software
sound
Statistics
subjective
Surveillance
Topology
transports
transversale
tresor
typographie
October 2010
September 2010
February 2010
October 2009
August 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
October 2008
September 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006

Paula Scher
2009-05-08 11:42:28 - by Antoine Berlon

JPEG - 101.3 ko
Europecrop
JPEG - 79 ko
Europedetail

In the early 1990s, renowned graphic designer Paula Scher began painting small, opinionated maps—colorful depictions of continents and regions, covered from top to bottom by a scrawl of words. Within a few years, the maps grew larger and more elaborate. “I began painting these things sort of in a silly way,” Scher, a partner at the Pentagram design firm, said in a recent conversation. “And I think at one point I realized they would be amazing big. And I wondered if I could even do it. If I could actually paint these things on such a grand scale, what would happen ?”

“Paula Scher : The Maps”—on view at New York’s Maya Stendhal Gallery until December 17—is the answer to that question. The exhibition presents twelve painstakingly detailed map paintings—of the United States, South America, Africa, Japan, and the world—spanning five to twelve feet in width and teeming with the neatly lettered names of countries, cities, and landmarks. The results are remarkable. http://www.metropolismag.com/story/20051110/paula-schers-atlas-of-the-world

JPEG - 62.3 ko
UScrop

Walking papers
2009-03-30 21:35:57 - by Nicolas Malevé

JPEG - 53.4 kb

«It’d be interesting for generated printouts of OSM data to encode enough source information to reconnect the scanned, scribbled-on result back with its point of origin, and use it as an online base map just like GPS traces and Yahoo aerial imagery.»

Read more of this beautiful idea