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40 more maps that
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An-atlas of Radical Cartography
2007-06-29 14:29:59 - by Kobe Matthys

An Atlas of Radical Cartography pairs artists, architects, designers, and collectives with writers to explore the map’s role as political agent. These 10 mapping projects and critical essays take on social and political issues from globalization to garbage.

http://www.an-atlas.com/index.htm

OSGeo Journal
2007-06-13 20:55:41 - by Nicolas Malevé

The first volume of the osgeo (Open Source Geospatial Foundation) journal is out.

The OSGeo Journal is a digital publication containing case studies, news, tutorials, project updates and more. With a general aim at promoting, highlighting and educating readers about open source geospatial applications in general, but also provides updates on OSGeo projects.

Link to the complete issue in pdf

DebianGis
2007-06-10 18:33:00 - by

DebianGis is about improving [WWW] Debian to make it the best distribution for Geographical Information Systems applications and users. A good deal of GIS related softwares and libraries (e.g. GRASS, see [WWW] http://grass.itc.it) are already present in Debian. Thanks to efforts of the DebianGis team, we have currently an up-to-date GRASS package in main and many other packages. Other programs are along their way to be included in the archive.

Carte Du Monde...
2007-06-06 12:41:00 - by

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“Carte Du Monde Utopique“ Marcel Broodthaers (1968)

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"Carte du monde poétique", Marcel Broodthaers (1968)

Mapping Hacks
2007-06-05 18:23:00 - by

Book:
Mapping Hacks: Tips & Tools for Electronic Cartography (Hacks) [ILLUSTRATED] (Paperback) by Schuyler Erle (Author), Rich Gibson (Author), Jo Walsh (Author)

Description by the editor:
"Mapping Hacks is a collection of one hundred simple techniques available to developers and power users who want to draw digital maps. You’ll learn where to find the best sources of geographic data and then how to integrate that data into your own creations. With so many industrial-strength tips and tools, Mapping Hacks effectively takes the sting out of digital mapmaking.

Since the dawn of creation, man has designed maps to help identify the space that we occupy. From Lewis and Clark’s pencil-sketched maps of mountain trails to Jacques Cousteau’s sophisticated charts of the ocean floor, creating maps of the utmost precision has been a constant pursuit. So why should things change now? Well, they shouldn’t. The reality is that map creation, or "cartography," has only improved in its ease-of-use over time. In fact, with the recent explosion of inexpensive computing and the growing availability of public mapping data, mapmaking today extends all the way to the ordinary PC user. Mapping Hacks, the latest page-turner from O’Reilly Press, tackles this notion head on. It’s a collection of one hundred simple—and mostly free—techniques available to developers and power users who want draw digital maps or otherwise visualize geographic data. Authors Schuyler Erle, Rich Gibson, and Jo Walsh do more than just illuminate the basic concepts of location and cartography, they walk you through the process one step at a time. Mapping Hacks shows you where to find the best sources of geographic data, and then how to integrate that data into your own map. But that’s just an appetizer. This comprehensive resource also shows you how to interpret and manipulate unwieldy cartography data, as well as how to incorporate personal photo galleries into your maps. It even provides practical uses for GPS (Global Positioning System) devices—those touch-of-a-button street maps integrated into cars and mobile phones. Just imagine: If Captain Kidd had this technology, we’d all know where to find his buried treasure! With all of these industrial-strength tips and tools, Mapping Hacks effectively takes the sting out of the digital mapmaking and navigational process. Now you can create your own maps for business, pleasure, or entertainment—without ever having to sharpen a single pencil."

Cartography and the Technologies of Location
2007-06-01 18:21:41 - by Nicolas Malevé

Suggested by Femke, a text by Graham Harwood that questions maps and software.


« Forgetting the invisible city is a normality for most of us : a common sense that can help amass someone an empire a small business or - as in Bristol - transport people half way around the world against their will. This forgetting offers us a temporary blindness that allows us to go about our daily business, walking past the sick, the homeless or the building built on glories that meant other peoples’ pain. In the same way that we forget the map and remember the journey, we also forget the software that wrote this text. »

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